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Thread: TJ Warren: Should he stay or should he go?

  1. #1
    Senior Member NCSUStu's Avatar
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    TJ Warren: Should he stay or should he go?

    ACC's leading scorer. Potential first round draft pick. He should probably go, and I wouldn't blame him for going while his draft stock is high. Strike while the iron's hot as they say. If he stays, he probably wouldn't have the same opportunity to keep up his scoring average. That is based on the premise that we will have more players capable of being offensive threats next season. However, I want him to be the kind of player that wants to give his all to the program. Help bring back the program his father played for. Try to break records. Become an NC State legend. I doubt he is hurting for money. He should realize that he will inevitably go pro, and the NBA will be waiting on him whenever he's ready. We haven't had a player like that since Julius Hodge. I understand players going pro early is good for recruiting, but so far that hasn't worked out for us. What's better for recruiting is when every high school player in the nation is watching our team play on national tv because we make it to the elite eight. I doubt anyone other than our fan's even remembers where JJ Hickson played his college ball.

    Plus Warren is a natural scorer. He has an amazing feel and touch around the basket. But I don't think he is at his best as the primary scorer. He has an uncanny knack for the timing of his cuts. He will be right there for an easy lay-up when his teammate draws a double team from the help defense. Or he will be right there to grab the offensive rebound for an easy put back. That's hard to do when they put the ball in your hands and expect you to score. He is amazing as an off-the-ball player. I miss the college ball of several years back. Every elite player says the same thing, "I want to win a national championship". They should follow that up with, "In the one year I play college ball". If you really want to win one, you stick around and develop team chemistry.

    As far as the NBA entrance requirements, I think they should do it like college baseball. You can sign and go pro right out of high school, but if they opt for the college scholarship, they have to stay at least 3 years. It would improve parity. Also, I think it would help lower the staggering rate of transfers. Kids would really put thought into the program they pick. They start picking a program they could see themselves in for years rather than just picking the team they think will give them the best chance to jump to the pros or get immediate playing time. I want Freshmen who know the only way they will get the start over a Junior or Senior is to bust their ass and win the competition. Harrow and Purvis are perfect examples of elite kids that wanted to come in and start immediately and then go pro after their first year. Harrow could have been great, but he still wouldn't have been physically developed enough to go pro after one year. Purvis wants to be a PG, because at his height pro teams would rather have him at the one rather than the two. However, if you just play your game and dominate, position doesn't matter. Leslie wanted to play SF because that is where he would fit in the pros. He had the athleticism and ability to handle the ball. However he had better post game than perimeter. Also look at Marcus Smart, he and his coach know he doesn't have a labeled position.

    Just wait, we will still be young next year. And then Barber will have a great Sophomore season and make the jump. Next thing you know, we will finally have depth and experience in the front-court only to be thin and young in the back-court.
    “How do you go from where you are to where you wanna be? And I think you have to have an enthusiasm for life. You have to have a dream, a goal. And you have to be willing to work for it.”

  2. #2
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    stu, i have always liked the way college baseball does it. actually, why declare for the draft? have the draft with nobody declaring. if a player gets drafted he make the decision then to go or not. if not, the nba team that drafts him retains the rights to him unless he stays until he exhausts his eligibility. if a player doesn't get drafted, no harm, no foul. carry on.

    as to tj turning pro or not, it's too early for me to make a decision. i'm on the fence.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Dof87's Avatar
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    I don't think a lot of coaches want to wait till the draft to determine if they have a hole to fill. Maybe the timing works better for baseball.

    It only makes sense for a kid to evaluate his draft decision after the season is over, not 3/4 of the way through. TJ seems to have the right folks giving him advice, and I imagine that is exactly what they are telling him. We all know he is has NBA talent and there is pretty good chance he'll go.
    Last edited by Dof87; 01-20-2014 at 08:33 AM.

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    I have always felt a kid should go if he is a lock 1st round pick, otherwise he should stay. TJ's father has said the same thing. So he won't really know where he stands until the season is over. As Dof87 said, he will get good advice.

  5. #5
    Senior Member TriangleDreamer's Avatar
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    The D league seems to be fast replacing college BB as the option for players to develop. If you have no real interest in a degree and don't come from money, it has to be compelling to jump as soon as you feel you can to the draft, especially knowing that even if you don't get big money as a lottery pick you still have a very good opportunity to make more money than most any other kid your age in another industry.

    To me, the two biggest changes could be to allow for direct draft from HS again, and to change the draft rule so that every kid can take ONE shot at getting drafted and have the option to come back to any school after sitting out a year (just like with D1 transfers). If the player opts to enter the draft a second time then they are ineligible to come back. Sure, it might potentially cause a lot more kids to test the NBA waters but it would also mean that those who were better served staying in school would at least have that option. It would actually make recruiting far more interesting because you suddenly could have an option to bring back a favorite player or score one who initially went somewhere else. And it might cut down on the "play or transfer" trend as those players would be more likely to use the 1 year of sitting out for the NBA draft option instead of switching schools.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Howler's Avatar
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    IMO, baseball's rule survives due to the lack of aggressive court challenges we've seen in basketball, a sport where I suspect it would almost immediately be struck down.

    H

  7. #7
    Senior Member Needtoknow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howler View Post
    IMO, baseball's rule survives due to the lack of aggressive court challenges we've seen in basketball, a sport where I suspect it would almost immediately be struck down.

    H
    Why do you say that? Baseball players have WAY more options that basketball players do.

    Who would challenge this and what would be the potential challange?

    A baseball player can be drafted out of high school, sign or go to college
    or get drafted after his junior season in college, sign or return to college
    or go to JUCO and be drafted after his sophomore season, sign or go on to a four year school.

    As for TJ, he is gone after this season.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Howler's Avatar
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    If Carlos Rodon had challenged it after this past season, claiming an infringement of his right to work, don't you think he could have been successful?

    I do.

    H

  9. #9
    Senior Member Needtoknow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Howler View Post
    If Carlos Rodon had challenged it after this past season, claiming an infringement of his right to work, don't you think he could have been successful?

    I do.

    H
    I dont, because he had the option of going pro out of high school or transfering to a JUCO and going pro as a sophomore.
    He was not prevented from going to MLB, he chose not to.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Howler's Avatar
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    He certainly signed a grant-in-aid. I'm unaware of any contract where he promised to abide by such rules as those currently imposed by the NCAA with regard to the draft and, even if he had, any attorney would argue he felt coerced into doing so in order to gain exposure to D-1 coaching and competition.

    Surely we can argue why but Rodon was an 11th rounder out of HS. Regardless, even after his freshman season he may have been a first rounder. Why should he have been forced to wait another two years, two years where he might also have been hurt, to gain the benefit of that improved draft status?

    H

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